Corporations

When is an S Corp election due?

For a corporation to be an S Corporation, the paperwork to make that effective is due no more than two months and 15 days after the beginning of the tax year the election is to take effect (yes, I copied that from the IRS instructions). If you’re really ahead of the game, then anytime during a tax year preceding the year you want it to be in effect. For new corporations, the tax year typically begins on a day other than January 1, unless you formed on that date. So, for example, if your corporation was formed on July 8, then the S Corp election would be due 15 days after September 7, or September 22.

By | August 10th, 2015|0 Comments

Can I cause my corporation to be an S Corp at the end of the year, after I see how my year has been?

You wish. But no. Congress treats this election as a go-forward business decision, not a look-back election. The good news is that it’s easy to revoke, or even “bust”, the election. But be careful about switching back and forth – as in, things don’t work that way.

By | August 10th, 2015|0 Comments

I’m causing my corporation to elect to be taxed as an S Corporation. Does my spouse have to sign?

You’re going to get different answers, depending on the advisor you ask, and the state you’re in. Generally, though, best practice is yes, and sometimes required. PS - If you're keeping this a secret from your spouse, then an S Election is not your biggest problem.

By | August 10th, 2015|0 Comments

Do I need all of the shareholders’ consent for the S Corp election?

Yes. It’s really that simple. Here’s a link to the IRS page that’s chock full of info. PS - Spouses too.

By | August 10th, 2015|0 Comments

Is my business big enough to justify the additional overhead of a corporation or LLC?

“Big” is a relative term. Size isn’t always the only, or even a significant, element to determining whether you should entity-ize your business. If you run a small business, but it’s a high-risk business, like, for example, a liquor store, then an LLC or corporation is probably a good idea, regardless of your revenue.

By | July 12th, 2015|0 Comments

What are the advantages of a C Corporation versus a sole proprietorship?

Short question . . . long answer. For the most part, the classic answer, which is also correct, is a C Corporation (or an S Corporation) provides limited liability for its owners and management. An S Corporation could provide additional tax benefits. On a less obvious level, having your business in a corporation may provide it with more “respect” in the business community, and may fend off nuisance suits.

By | July 12th, 2015|0 Comments

How long does it take to form a corporation or LLC, in California? What about other states?

California varies – sometimes it’s a matter of days, but sometimes, especially at the beginning of the year, it can take a couple weeks. You can always submit your documents on a rush (24 hours or even same day) basis. Other states? It really depends. Delaware’s quick.

By | July 12th, 2015|0 Comments

Will putting my business into a corporation or LLC help me save taxes?

It can, but not always. It’s not often the case that a business will put their business into an entity solely to save on taxes, although S Corporations for small businesses are frequently and legitimately used for that purpose.

By | July 12th, 2015|0 Comments

Is there a lot of paperwork? Do I have to do it all?

There’s some paperwork . . . corporations tend to have more paperwork, which is why some people might immediately gravitate to LLCs, or nothing at all. And, yes, if you want to maintain your status as a corporation, and maintain your limited liability, don’t cut corners on the paperwork. It’s important.

By | July 12th, 2015|0 Comments

I just put my business into a corporation/LLC. Do I have to file paperwork for that?

If you have an existing business, then its assets and contracts should get transferred to your corporation. This can look like an assignment, or a bill of sale. There are tax considerations regarding contribution of the assets of your existing business. You may also need to notify third parties, such as vendors and landlords. A stitch in time, as they say. Paperwork is king.

By | June 15th, 2015|0 Comments